Articles by: Consultancy Africa Intelligence
This article is produced by Consultancy Africa Intelligence which is the source of expert research and analysis on Africa, in Africa.For more information visit http://www.consultancyafrica.com/

Unravelling South Africa’s opaque foreign nuclear cooperation agreements

August 23, 2014 11:54 am0 comments
Unravelling South Africa’s opaque foreign nuclear cooperation agreements

Written by Donald Stewart
South African President Jacob Zuma’s intention to secure nuclear power expansion is increasingly evident and the country’s forthcoming nuclear expansion has attracted several foreign suitors and the signing of agreements with corporations from China, the European Union (EU), France, Germany, Russia, South Korea and the United States (US), amongst others. ………….

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African infrastructure financing: Closing the gap under tight fiscal constraints

October 7, 2013 2:02 am0 comments
African infrastructure financing: Closing the gap under tight fiscal constraints

Inadequate infrastructure continues to be a major binding constraint to Africa’s quest for sustained economic growth. The region has attained impressive growth rates over the past decade, buoyed to a large extent by a commodity boom from 2000, albeit now subsiding, and an improvement in the macroeconomic environment of many countries. Still, Africa continues to grapple with a massive infrastructure gap, notably in the water, sanitation, power and health sectors, which have a high social return, but which private investors often avoid due to their limited revenue-generating capacity.

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How ethnic factors fuel conflicts in Central and East Africa. An ACMM interview with Dr Patience Kabamba conducted by James Hall

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Dr Patience Kabamba is currently an Assistant Professor of International Studies at Marymount Manhattan College in New York, having spent several years as a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Development Studies at the University of Johannesburg. Dr Kabamba has intensive ethnographic experience concerning new social formations that emerge when states disintegrate in war-torn Africa: Burundi, the DRC, Rwanda and Uganda. His theoretical interests are the dynamics of conflict, new state formations, transnational trade networks, ethnicity, and global political and economic governance.

In this exclusive Africa Conflict Monthly Monitor (ACMM) interview, Dr Patience Kabamba discusses ethnicity and conflict in Central and East Africa. Dr Kabamba has intensive ethnographic experience concerning new social formations that emerge when states disintegrate in war-torn Africa: Burundi, the DRC, Rwanda and Uganda. His theoretical interests are the dynamics of conflict, new state formations, transnational trade networks, ethnicity, and global political and economic governance. Mr Kabamba, thank you for speaking with us. Might we begin by asking for a background in ethnic studies and how ethnicity relates to conflict situations in Central and East Africa? How did you develop an interest in this field? What are your current […]

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Voice of China: In pursuit of soft power

1:47 am0 comments
Headquarters; CCTV Tower; CCTV New Year's Gala; CCTV America; CCTV Africa; Television Broadcasting

China’s economic success and entry onto the world stage has firmly established the country as a force to be reckoned with, certainly in economic terms. China overtook Japan to become the world’s second largest economy in 2010 and there are scholars who forecast that it could overtake even the United States (US) within a few years to become the world’s largest economy.(2) But, despite its economic prowess, China has yet to match the soft power influence of the US.

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Special Economic Zones: Can South Africa follow in the Dragon’s footsteps?

September 3, 2013 7:13 pm0 comments
Special Economic Zones: Can South Africa follow in the Dragon’s footsteps?

Special Economic Zones (SEZs) have become the new buzzword for African governments, who see in them the long-awaited salvation from the poverty scourge that has gripped the continent despite decades of structural reform programmes. SEZs are generally defined as specially demarcated areas that offer unique incentives for a diverse range of economic activities.On the other hand, free trade zones (FTZs), usually found next to sea ports and airports, allow unrestricted import and export of goods free of customs, while export processing zones (EPZs) specifically encourage investment and manufacturing for export.China’s success with its SEZ model has caught on with African leaders eager to try something new.

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Chinese money for Ghana’s natural resources:The real cost

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china ghana

China’s growing interest in Africa has resulted in huge capital flows into the continent. From multi-billion dollar investments in oil and minerals, to the influx of thousands of merchants, labourers and cheap consumer goods, China’s economic and political reach is redefining Africa’s traditional ties with the international community.

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A subtle engagement: Ethiopia and India

6:47 pm0 comments
Ethiopia Indina

Even as the global economy has suffered from a prolonged crisis, a number of African countries have seen significant growth. Ethiopia stands out among them. With double-digit growth for the last decade, Ethiopians have seen their purchasing power double, from US$ 527 per capita in 2003 to over US$ 1,100 in 2011.Much of this success has come from relationships with new geopolitical giants, including the so-called BRICs nations, Brazil, Russia, India, and China. The “BRICs effect,” according to the African Progress Panel, “helped first to insulate Africa partially from the global economic downturn, and then to drive recovery.

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Seeking greener pastures: Portuguese emigration to former African colonies

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Seeking greener pastures: Portuguese emigration to former African colonies

The recession-induced Portuguese influx to its former colonies, Angola and Mozambique, is rooted in deeply structural conditions and is also, to a significant degree, a product of historical and political construction and the common language factor. It not only signals changes in the contemporary migration patterns and the ways in which migration flows are channelled internationally, but also highlights the lingering historical and socio-political ties of the colonial period, and suggests that we are currently witnessing shifts in global power dynamics. Although north-south and south-south migration are well documented phenomena, the current frameworks for international north-south migration is lacking and is in need of improvement. As the Portugal-Africa dynamics have been picked up by many global media outlets lately, it can be expected that researchers, multilateral organisations and government bodies will take interest in the unfolding trend, leading to the production of more comprehensive empirical and analytical materials in the near future.

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Education access entitlement: The right to schooling for young women in Tanzania

6:18 pm0 comments

Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the face by Taliban gunmen in October 2012 for claiming her right to education, celebrated her sixteenth birthday on 12 July 2013. Together with hundreds of education activists at the United Nations (UN) headquarters in New York, Yousafazi campaigned for concerted global efforts to ensure that every young person has the opportunity to fulfil their potential through access to a quality education.

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